3 Tips for Surviving the Second Act

Remember when I told you that my blog posts would be fewer and further between as work away at NaNoWriMo, trying to finish this monkey of a novel that has been hanging onto my back for four years? Well, it turns out that I was right.

And I’m sorry. It hardly seems fair that I should introduce myself to you with a post-a-day series, and then abandon you entirely the month after, but c’est la writing vie. (And I was a French teacher and all.)

Anyway, I just started my second act today – the part that can feel like such a slog – and while this is a H.U.G.E milestone for me with this particular book, it’s already killing my soul. The problem is, that I, like most writers might, I think, have outlined several important and crucial scenes both in my main plot and my major subplot, but I haven’t the slightest idea how to get from scene to scene without putting everyone, including me, to sleep. That’s right, I failed at taking my own advice.

I’m trying not to get too stressed out about it, because I know I’ll figure it all out in the rewrite, but the second act has a huge capacity for making the writer feel like the failure. So this is what I’m doing to get through it and hopefully keep the plot moving apace.

1. I set a goal. I decided what day I would arrive at each major scene so that I can look at a plan and determine exactly when this nightmare would be over. For me, Act II should be done by next Thursday, with major main-plot scenes happening on Thursday and Tuesday.

2. I break it into manageable chunks. Four page sections work well for me because it’s what I do (see blog title) So I decide what will happen for four pages, and I write a note reminding myself of what happens in that scene. For example:

  • 85-88: at the Myersville safe house
  • 89-92: Grady meets with Ben – readers learn Ben’s history
  • 93-96: Grady passes on intel to Michael

3. I write. I stay within the parameters of my mini-outline and write the scene I’ve set for myself. Sometimes the scenes get boring, sometimes I wish they would hurry up and get over, but my outline keeps me on track and ensures that I am writing every day. It also makes sure I deliver crucial information that might get lost as I barrel forward to the more exciting parts.

Keep in mind that even if a scene doesn’t seem like it’s working, you can tweak it in the rewrite. The important thing right now (for me and you) is to keep moving forward.


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